Lithuania - Article 27

Article 27

Measures to support employers
Measures to support workers with disabilities
Discrimination
Employment on the open labour market
Employment in the supported / sheltered sector
Employment in the public sector
Employment of blind and partially sighted women
Self-employment
Vocational rehabilitation and training
Incentive measures to employ workers with disabilities
Legal obligation to employ workers with disabilities
Vocational counselling
Main occupations performed by workers with a visual impairment
Looking for a job
Legal recognition of disabled worker status
Trade unions and workers with disabilities
 

Measures to support employers

The 2006 Employment Support Law and the 2004 Law on Social Enterprises are the main legislative items to support employers who hire disabled workers in Lithuania.

Private and public sector employers are supported under Article 26 of the 2006 Employment Support Law, which offers wage subsidy schemes based on the amount of hours of work in relation to the Lithuanian hourly minimum wage.

If the disabled worker has a working capacity rated between 45 and 55%, the employer is eligible to a fixed-term subsidy for a period of up to 12 months and a bonus on their social insurance contribution fee. The amount of the subsidy may not exceed that of the Lithuanian monthly minimum wage. Employers who hire disabled workers on the basis of a temporary work contract are only eligible to wage subsidies and bonuses for up to 3 months.

Employers who hire disabled workers on the basis of permanent work contracts are entitled to further bonuses. The Lithuanian government offers one bonus for the creation of each new position to encourage new openings. Employers may also apply for funding to cover the cost of adapting the premises, providing they pay for at least 35% of the total adaptation cost and retain the disabled employee for at least 36 months. In total this scheme will not exceed the equivalent of 22 average monthly wages (as published nationally).

Social enterprises employers are supported under the 2004 Law on Social Enterprises. The government runs six funding schemes, all of which can be cumulated by social enterprises with a disabled workforce :

• Wage subsidy and bonuses on social insurance fee contributions;
• Bonus for each position opening, and funding towards the adaptation of the premises or acquiring specific equipment;
• Funding scheme to assist with employee's training
• Funding to adapt the work place, acquire equipment and create rest rooms;
• Subsidy to cover additional administrative costs and transport expenses;
• Funding scheme to hire a disability assistant, interpreter or guide.

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Measures to support workers with disabilities

Disability workers are supported by Article 26 of the 2006 Employment Support Law, Article 129 of the 2002 Law on Labour and Article 20 of the 2002 Individual Income Tax Act. These are the main legislations governing this aspect in Lithuania.

Workers with disabilities are entitled to adjustments and arrangements in their working hours, shifts and resting time. The permanent work contract of a disabled worker may only be terminated if the employer demonstrates that retaining the employee would out weight the company's resources. In case of redundancy, the notice period concerning a disabled worker is set at four months (instead of two). Disabled workers are also entitled to five weeks paid annual leave (instead of four) and they receive a bonus on their income tax payments..

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Discrimination

Both direct and indirect disability-based discriminations are prohibited in Lithuania under the 2008 Law on Equal Treatment and the 2004 Law on Social Integration of the Disabled. Any such act can be brought before the courts of justice.

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Employment on the open labour market

The 2002 Law on Labour is the main legislation concerning open labour employment in Lithuania, with Article 129 paragraph 4 being particularly relevant to disabled workers.

The 2006 Employment Support Law and the 2004 Law on Social Enterprises are also relevant in terms of the measures to support employers and disabled employees.

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Employment in the supported / sheltered sector

TThe 2004 Social Enterprises Law is the main legislation concerning employment in social enterprises in Lithuania.
This legislation defines two types of social enterprises :
• Social enterprises
• Social enterprises with a disabled workforce

The government runs six funding schemes, all of which can be cumulated by social enterprises with a disabled workforce (other social enterprises are only entitled to the first three schemes) :

• Wage subsidy and bonuses on social insurance fee contributions;
• Bonus for each position opening, and funding towards the adaptation of the premises or acquiring specific equipment;
• Funding scheme to assist with employee's training
• Funding to adapt the work place, acquire equipment and create rest rooms;
• Subsidy to cover additional administrative costs and transport expenses;
• Funding scheme to hire a disability assistant, interpreter or guide.

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Employment in the public sector

Public sector employment is not regulated by a specific legislation as far as disabled workers are concerned. Conditions are therefore similar to that observed in the private sector. The 2002 Law on Labour is the main legislation concerning employment in Lithuania, with Article 129 paragraph 4 being particularly relevant to disabled workers.

Like private companies, public offices are supported under Article 26 of the 2006 Employment Support Law, which offers wage subsidy schemes based on the amount of hours of work in relation to the Lithuanian hourly minimum wage. Bonuses are also available to encourage new job openings and to assist with adapting the premises.

Workers with disabilities are entitled to adjustments and arrangements in their working hours, shifts and resting time. The work contract of a disabled worker may only be terminated if the employer demonstrates that retaining the employee would out weight the office's resources. In case of redundancy, the notice period concerning a disabled worker is set at four months (instead of two). Disabled workers are also entitled to five weeks paid annual leave (instead of four)

Under Article 20 of the 2002 Individual Income Tax Act, disabled workers receive a bonus on their tax payments.

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Employment of blind and partially sighted women.

There are no specific measures concerning blind and partially sighted woman in Lithuania. The 2008 Law on Equal Treatment, the 2004 Law on Social Integration of the Disabled and the 1998 Law on Equal Treatment for Men and Woman forbid both gender-based and disability-based discrimination. In theory, therefore, disabled female workers should be in a position to enjoy the same opportunity level as their male peers.

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Self Employment

The 2006 Law on Employment Support is the main pieces of legislation concerning self-employment in Lithuania, with article 32 paragraph 4 bearing particular relevance for disabled workers.

The Lithuania government offers a range of grants and funding programmes to support people who are willing to create their own job, including the disabled. In addition, disabled people with a working capacity rated at 40% or less may receive additional assistance in the form of specific schemes to assist with adaptation expenses or to acquire specific equipment. The amount of financial support may be up to 22 average monthly wages (as published nationally).

Like disabled employees, self-employed disabled workers are eligible to receive bonuses on their income tax and social insurance fees.

The 2004 Law on Social Integration of the Disabled which regulates vocational rehabilitation and training also applied to self employed disabled workers. They may thus receive a grant to cover training and coaching that are relevant to the self-employed business project

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Vocational rehabilitation and training

No information.

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Incentive measures to employ workers with disabilities.

No information.

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Legal obligation to employ workers with disabilities

No information.

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Vocational counselling.

No information.

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Main occupations performed by workers with a visual impairment.

Workers with visual impairment are found in a variety of professions in Lithuania. Common occupations include :
• Masseurs
• Lawyers and legal workers
• Teachers and journalists
• Office workers
• Social workers
• Information technology specialists
• Creative artists and craftsmen.
A number of visually impaired workers are currently employed in the industrial enterprises run by the Lithuanian Association of the Blind and Visually Handicapped.

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Looking for a job

No information.

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Legal recognition of disabled worker status

No information.

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Trade unions and workers with disabilities.

No information.

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